A Collection of Downloadable Twitter-Papers

August 10, 2009 at 10:12 am | Posted in Uncategorized, Web 2.0 | Leave a comment
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Though Twitter only went public in July 2006 (according to Wikipedia, though many papers such as Java et al 2007 cite October 2006 as the launch date) quite an amount of Twitter research has already been published. Here is an overview of downloadable papers – please let me know if you find anything else.

P.S: Some of these papers can only be downloaded from a (university) library. If you have access to the network of Vienna University, you need to establish a VPN connection through univpn.univie.ac.at/. Login, select AnyConnect, establish VPN trough the browser or download the VPN client if the browser connection doesn’t work smoothly.

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60% of Twitter users do not return the following month? They might return a year later

August 10, 2009 at 10:08 am | Posted in Web 2.0 | Leave a comment
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So we have all read the story about the so-called ‘Twitter quitters’, i.e. people who do not return the following month and the percentage of which, according to Nielsen, amounts to 60%. This single month is probably not enough to conclude that users “wind up abandoning the service” – or at least that is what my (very limited sample of 17 users) suggests.

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The World is divided…

May 26, 2008 at 7:43 am | Posted in Funny Stuff | 2 Comments
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into people who do and people who don’t understand Geek and Poke. Thank you, Oliver Widder, for making my day daily:-)

Geek and Poke

An Email to Yahoo/Flickr regarding privacy leak

January 26, 2008 at 12:44 am | Posted in privacy | 2 Comments
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Here is a copy of my email to Yahoo (for Flickr) Germany (they automatically forward me to the German site, due the my IP I suppose), addressing the privacy issue raised by the 30boxes mashup (I wrote about that here). I picked the ‘Infringement of Privacy’ label, hopefully I’ll get a response, hopefully they’ll fix that problem.

Dear Yahoo,

I just learned that, due to an open API at Flickr, it is now possible to extract and MATCH ones nickname and email address and make that connection public. That means: Knowing someone’s email address suffices to retrieve that person’s flickr account.

This is currently possible using the services of a website called www.30boxes.com. 30boxes offers a calendar services and claims to allow people to do the following:

* organize your stuff
* plan your day
* keep up with your friends

Unfortunately, in their interpretation, a friend is someone whose email address you know (an unfortunate misunderstanding that could also be witnessed in the recent disclosure of shared items to everyone in your contact list at Googlemail)

Similarly, keeping up with your friends at 30 boxes works the following way: Once you have signed up, you can “Find buddies” by entering the email addresses of people you know (of course, knowing someone’s email address does _not_ mean that you are friends!)

30boxes then attempts to retrieve data from the APIs of – among others – Flickr, Twitter, Myspace.

What is disconcerting here is that it, in the case of flickr – matches nicknames and emailaddresses, meaning that the privacy that the nickname offers is jeopardized.

I, for instance, entered the email of a friend (which I am not going to type in here, as I am also going to publish a copy of this email on my blog) and immediately received a link to her flickr account – I am very sure that she isn’t too pleased about this.

I am probably lucky that 30boxes wasn’t able to match my email address with my flickr account (for which ever reason) – nonetheless, I wonder whether:

a) Flickr knows about this vulnerability of their API

b) this vulnerability is covered by the terms and services (I doubt that I would understand the legal language that defines the use of APIs, hence I haven’t checked myself).

In any case: The fact that one HAS the opportunity to chose a nickname does, in my view, suggest that the connection between nickname and email address should also NOT be revealed to third parties nor made public, e.g. publicized in the 30 boxes mashup.

Furthermore: If a user gives out his or her email address, that does not necessarily mean that he or she also meant to allow this person to see his or her flickr account. This is, however, the consequence of opening your api to third parties like 30 boxes.

Your feedback is very much appreciated.

Best wishes

Anaj Blog

I might have to send emails to Twitter, Myspace etc. as well.

Quick hello from Innsbruck

June 21, 2007 at 3:37 pm | Posted in Blogging, Microlearning | 2 Comments
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I’m in the middle of the microlearning conference, and believe it or not: I am a convert. Twitter DOES actually work, in particular in environments like these. While the first two keynotes were presented, people commented on what was being said by the speakers – only that you couldn’t hear them. But the comments offered different views on the talk, maybe views that otherwise would not have been expressed, publicly. Of course it only works if you have a certain community of people who share interests – they have to have at least one thing in common. Obvious disadvantage: It also draws attention away from the speakers, as – even if multi-tasking – you cannot divide your attention between different things. You’re either writing or reading a twitter message or listening to the talk. That may lead to semi-attentive audiences – so as a presenter, you have to be prepared for that (and not be offended if that happens).

Microlearning 2007

Btw, when we were on the train this morning, my two colleagues and I made jokes about how we would immediately take pictures and upload them to our blogs – and that’s what I am doing right now. Harr! (Pictures taken with iSight; my MacBook stopped making those velcro noises).

Microlearning2007

The Twittering Conference

June 16, 2007 at 7:18 pm | Posted in Microlearning | Leave a comment
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I received an invite today to join the Twitter group for the upcoming Microlearning Conference.

hello,

for the conference we set up a little live experiment in microcontent.
don’t forget to bring your wifi-enabled laptop and your mobile phone!

if you subscribe to “Twitter” (it is free), you will not only be able to
get the latest conference announcements ‘live’, in real time, but also
to share with the other “twittering” participants your thoughts &
impressions throughout the conference.
we are sure this will add to the atmosphere, and it is a quite
instructive experience in real microcontent too!

it takes only 5 minutes. just have a look at this visual micro-tutorial:

http://www.slideshare.net/MicrolearningOrg/ml2007-twitter-shorttutorial-v2

then wait for your first twitter messages to come in from the Conference
Channel at

http://www.twitter.com/micro2007

Twitter messages will be sent to your mobile phone too (for free!), if
you choose this option on your twitter-website!
you can turn this on and off anytime …

(the few participants who are using twitter already may want to create a
new twitter-ID just for the conference.)

cheers

xxx
ConferenceChair

Sounds like fun, huh? 😉

Put Yourself to the Test: with Twitter, 24/7 (23/40)

March 15, 2007 at 7:48 am | Posted in Digital Culture, Lent, Tagging, Web 2.0 | 8 Comments
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Thank God the twitter craze, which has already found its antithesis in the Twitter hater, has not yet made it to (non-English speaking) European shores – or if it has, I am blissfully unaware of it. It is another more or less Web 2.0 social platform, describing itself in its own words as

A global community of friends and strangers answering one simple question: What are you doing? Answer on your phone, IM, or right here on the web!

Today I signed up to see what the fuss was all about, and tell Twitter what I was doing I did:

Twatter

While this might sound like a rather pointless activity to some, it seems to be warmly embraced by those digital, decentred PoMo subjects out there who hardly have a sense of themselves anywayr. Twitter won’t help them to find the way back to a more integrated self, but console them with the illusion that, if their self is scattered all over the place, at least they might have an idea where they can retrieve the bits and pieces. For a brief moment, they can inscribe themselves on the surface of the simulations that surround them. The whole thing gets a (little) bit more interesting by the fact that twitter allows you to notify your friends to tell them what you are doing and to get notifications about them. Hmm.

The twitter homepage gives you an idea of the things those desperate souls are up to:

Twatter

Not convinced? Ha! In a way it was useful that Baudrillard ‘died’, otherwise I wouldn’t have dug him up from the sediments of my memory nor have been receptive to other folks’ writing about him. If you look at the phenomenology of Twitter, you’ll soon find out that it takes on the form of what Baudrillard has described as ‘the test’:

This regulation on the model of the genetic code is not at all limited to laboratory effects or to the exalted visions of theoreticians. Banal, everyday life is invested by these models. Digitality is with us. It is that which haunts all the messages, all the signs of our societies. The most concrete form you see it in is that of the test, of the question/answer, of the stimulus/response. All content is neutralized by a continual procedure of directed interrogation, of verdicts and ultimatums to decode, which no longer arise this time from the depths of the genetic code but that have the same tactical indeterminacy – the cycle of sense being infinitely shortened into that of question/answer, of bit or minute quantity of energy/information coming back to its beginning, the cycle only describing the perpetual reactualization of the same models. The equivalent of the total neutralization of the signified by the code is the instantaneousness of the verdict of fashion, or of any advertising or media message. Any place where the offer swallows up the demand, where the question assimilates the answer, or absorbs and regurgitates it in a decodable form, or invents and anticipates it in a predictible form. Everywhere the same “scenario,” the scenario of “trial and error” (guinea pigs in laboratory experiments), the scenario of the breadth of choice offered everywhere (“the personality test”) – everywhere the test functions as a fundamental form of control, by means of the infinite divisibility of practices and responses.

We live by the mode of referendum precisely because there is no longer any referential. Every sign, every message (objects of “functional” use as well as any item of fashion or televised news, poll or electoral consultation) is presented to us as question/answer. The entire system of communication has passed from that of a syntactically complex language structure to a binary sign system of question/answer – of perpetual test. Now tests and referenda are, we know, perfect forms of simulation: the answer is called forth by the question, it is designated in advance. The referendum is always an ultimatum: the unilateral nature of the question, that is no longer exactly an interrogation, but the immediate imposition of a sense whereby the cycle is suddenly completed. Every message is a verdict, just like the one that comes from polling statistics. The simulacrum of distance (or even of contradiction between the two poles) is only – like the effect of the real the sign seems to emit – a tactical hallucination. (The Tactile and the Digital in: Simulations. The Order of Simulacra)

Twitter’s perpetual question ‘What are you doing?’ is precisely such a litmus test of the twitters’ contained form of existence. The content of their messages, denoting what they seem to be doing, is completely irrelevant, but in answering, they’re integrated into the system of production. Who would ever have thought in the 1970s, when the first data security officers had to be hired by governments and companies alike, that people would one day crave to be controlled in this way!

More posts regarding twitter:
RIP Twitter (2007-2007) (con)
Could Advertising Pollute Twitter? (pro-ish)
RIP Twitter – A Rebuttal (pro)

P.S.: I have myself taken up a new hobby: tagging my images on flickr with tags that don’t make sense in order to shift the signal/noise ratio a bit more to the incomprehensible. For my twitter screens, I chose ‘twatter’. But I am not a real revolutionary, as you can see if you look at my vast array of WordPress tags – I have to admit that it’s basically copyright issues that I want to circumvent in doing so. Garbage in, garbage out!

P.P.S.: Another thing I am trying to understand for the third time now are trackback links. Is my blog trackback enabled? Yes/No? What do I need to do with someone else’s trackback URL? I am going to incorporate the trackback URL to the Twitter hater post, but I don’t really think that that’s the way to do it? Must I maybe click on it later? EDIT: I did, but nothing of what happened seemed to make sense.

P.P.S.: The final countdown: 17 more days to go until the end of Lent!

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