Bridging the digital divide – OLPC or Intel Classmate?

February 4, 2008 at 9:14 am | Posted in learning | 4 Comments
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While I was sufficiently familiar with the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project, I have only heard now about the Intel Classmate Project which is currently focusing on Nigeria. The BBC was so kind as to put together a list of videos exploring the benefits of OLPC and Classmate.

OLPC Classmate

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  1. Hmm. Interesting about the Intel Classmate project – I’ll have to look into that. Still – I think both projects haven’t really looked into the true issues, and are only treating symptoms.

  2. Yep, I whole-heartedly agree – although I am trying to be less biased about their approach and see what the outcomes her. While they help promoting literacy/alphabetisation, for instance?

  3. Well… the QWERTY keyboard was originally designed to be inefficient, as one example. The design was to keep mechanical keys from sticking on old typewriters… no kidding.

    One of the things that gets me – as an autodidact – is that in a young autodidact’s hands, either system could be the cat’s meow. But they aren’t trying to use it with autodidacts, they are trying to shuffle this stuff into curriculum. And those curriculum are not globally compatible – a big deal around the world.

    And… in developing nations… where do you think computers get tossed when they die? One step away from the water table. Which of course cuts into agriculture, which… funny how that works, you know?

  4. Yep, I vaguely remember that (I do wonder though – why do we have a qwertz keyboard in Europe – because we use the z more often? they should have adapted the entire thing:-)

    Everything gets just dumped in Africa, in partciular if you are north of South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. I guess it won’t take to long until we see a bright green or blue mini laptop being worked into the plaster of a mud hut. I am not kidding.


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