Re:re:re:repost: Edinburgh

November 19, 2007 at 11:33 pm | Posted in Food | 5 Comments
Tags: , , , ,

I am tired of blogging. At least I finally managed to import my Edinburgh blog – and I’ll simply copy and paste an oooooold story into this new post. I’m doing it to support the fish and chips industries. If you want to have more: Here is a link to all Edinburgh blog posts (a bit more than a year old).
******
TREAT FROM A CHIPPY
This is how the cookie crumbles! A layer of white paper:

A layer of brown paper:

And a layer of batter.

Hmmmmmh.

Use your fingers,

grab a bite, and then:

Dig in!

The remnants of the feast (probably worth a full afternoon snack on a weight watchers diet…)

My next project: the deep fried battered Mars bar. Stay tuned!

5 Comments »

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  1. Hi Anaj!

    I’m longing for the promised “deep fried battered Mars bar” post.😉

    In the meanwhile it happened that I need an Englisch expertise on following topic:
    In german is – as far as I know – the “Fräulein” disestalished and these days I realized a Ms and Mrs nebulosity in business English. Is it approbriate to adress someone as Miss or is “Ms” the same nowadays than “Mrs”?
    Can you help me out? (sounds like “Fragen Sie Frau Andrea! at http://www.comandantina.com/).

    Thanks a lot. Uli

  2. Well, it more or less works like this: In a letter to a female, you would use Ms (British English) or Ms. (American English) – UNLESS you know that the person is question has expressed a preference for either Miss (Fräulein) or Mrs. (Frau).

    This is one of the few things where the English language is lagging behind, in comparison to German:-)

    See the Guardian Style guide (primarily for article writing but also adaptable to letters):

    Mr, Ms, Mrs, Miss
    In leading articles: use the appropriate honorific after first mention (unless you are writing about an artist, author, journalist, musician, sportsman or woman, criminal or dead person, who take surname only); use Ms for women subsequently unless they have expressed a preference for Miss or Mrs.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/styleguide/

  3. So, “Ms” is not the abbrevation for Miss, it is valid for both terms. And with using “Ms” I’m on the safe side.
    To my german (?!) feelings “Ms” was quite unpolite.

    Thanks a lot, Anaj!

    Uli

  4. A and what about the “deep fried battered Mars bar” ??

  5. Yes, Ms as a cheap trick to include both – can of course only be used in writing…

    Since you asked for it: here is a (low quality) video of the deep fried battered mars bar – I don’t think I am ever going to have another one….



    That was more than a year ago during my teacher training course in Edinburgh (the times they are a changing…)


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