My favourite English words, pt. 1

June 20, 2007 at 8:51 am | Posted in English, Word | 9 Comments
Tags: ,

Muzzle. It sounds so soft. Who’d have thought.

muzzle (ANIMAL)
noun [C]
the mouth and nose of an animal, especially a dog, or a covering put over this in order to prevent the animal from biting

I’d like to have this one as a handbag:

Muzzle

9 Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

  1. doch, how interesting – if he’s British, it must be tough for him to pronounce it the right way – like muzzle is difficult for me (the soft z). although I sympathize – in South arica I particularly liked the:

    ag, shame, man!

    _the g in ag pronounced like the ch in doch

    ask him how he likes ‘genau’

    Der Galgen
    Der Strick
    Das Beil
    Das Schafott
    Die Guillotine
    Die Mordwaffe

    http://www.dict.cc/

  2. btw, South Africa
    Although South Arica is a weird slip for a German.

    Oh, it’s about to rain!

  3. Definitely where I live (close to Lake Constance and the Swiss border) – the weather is either gorgeous or shitty, with nothing in between. Now its shitty, I suppose around noon it’s going to be gorgeous.
    http://karren.protask.at/

  4. Wow!! Me too… loved that one 🙂

  5. Hey Nova – the word or the view?

  6. The hard “ch” isn’t that difficult. The u/ü distinction is far worse.

    “Genau”… strongly reminds me of my polish ex, who used to say it in a high-pitched american-dumb-blonde voice, quite frequently. I completely forget why. “Schön” is another nice word. More flexible than the english equivalent.

    Coincidentally, just across the road from the university there’s a road called “Am Galgenberg” (“By the Gallows Hill”).

  7. I might have a trick for you – when I taught German in South Africa back in 1998, one students suggested that the ü be pronounced like the first sound in the diphthong in ‘food’ – and it’s true, but only if you know how south africans pronounce food…

  8. The only person I know of south african origin spoke english with no discernable foreign accent, but I know what you mean; the Irish do something similar to ü when they say “you”.

    The problem I have is not just pronunciation, tho – I can do a passable ü if I try – it’s that ü is just a variation on u, in english (see, e.g., south africans & irish), so it’s difficult to pick up on the difference. I just don’t notice which one other people are saying; I don’t always notice which one I’m saying…

  9. That’s right – certain sounds are not discernible for speakers of certain languages – think of the German attempts to say love and laugh. Also, the trick above doesn’t help explain the difference between füller and fühlen either – it’s a different sound, not just the difference between short and long vowel.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: